2 EASY Chord Transition Tricks [FUN exercises to practice]

2 EASY Chord Transition Tricks [FUN exercises to practice]


When you’re brand new to
acoustic guitar learning, your first set of chord shapes
is super fun and exhilarating. But the other part of learning
chord shapes is being able
to transition from one shape to another. So in this lesson I’m going to share
with you some tips and tricks on how to make chord transitions easier.
And in this particular lesson, what we’re going to focus on
are two types of transitions, one in which a single finger is in common
in between two chords and the other type of transition where you’re basically
picking your fingers up from one cord and completely changing
them for the next. Okay, so let’s start with the easy one where
a finger stays in common between both chord shapes and the chords
I’m gonna choose for. This are going to be the
g chord and the d chord. And we’re going to be changing from a
g to a d and then back from a d to a g. And even though this chord change and
transition might look intimidating, it’s actually much easier once you get
used to it and see that there is indeed one finger in common. So this is just one lesson in a series
where I’ll take you from zero to guitar player in 30 days by teaching you the
four super fund skills that’ll get you hooked on guitar. Before you get started, you’ll need to download the tabs course
guide and 30 day checklist to get yours. Just click on the link in the
video or visit 30 days to play.com. So let’s start with a g chord. Pinky finger on the third fret of the
high e in a ring finger on the third fret of the B index finger. Second
Front of the a middle finger, third fret of the low e.
Go ahead and strum that. Now you’re going to be
changing to a d chord, okay? And the cool thing is here is that your
ring finger is going to stay in position on that third fret of the B string. So I
want you to keep that ring finger down, lift up all the other fingers, okay?
It’s gonna feel weird at first, but you’ll get used to it. The more
you do it, the easier it’ll get. You’re gonna drop your middle finger
to the second fret of the high e index finger to the second fret of
the g, and that is your d chord. So again, I’ll just do this
slowly. When you’re on that g cord, you’re going to lift up every
finger, but your ring finger, shoot your middle finger down to the high
e string index finger to the g string. Bam, you land on your d. And the same is true when
you go from d to g, right? You’re going to keep
that ring finger down, shoot your middle finger
up to that low east string, lower your pinkie to that third fret of
the high e and drop your index to the second fret of the a string.
And that’s something right now. If you want to pause this video, you
can just practice over and over again, right? Strum the G, go ahead and change work through that
transition to the d chord strum, the d. Once you have that ring, a nice and solid to go ahead and
change that back to a g chord. And that’s one of those occurrences where
you have one finger that’s in common between both chord shapes. Well, what happens when you have to basically
lift up your entire hand and switch it to another cord? Say for
example, a g chord to a c chord. It feels a little bit disorienting, but there’s a trick that you can use that
I still use to this day that helps me out tremendously when I’m making core
changes that feel like it’s basically jumping off a cliff, right? So here’s
what I want you to do with me right now. Go ahead and make your g court same one
we were making at the beginning of the lesson, and then I want you
to lift off your fingers. It’s going to feel a little strange, but I want you to then
slowly make a c shape. Drop your ring finger first on
the third fret of the a string, middle finger, second fret of the d
index finger. First Front of the B. Do it in that order. Almost like
a, if you push a lead domino, think of your ring finger
as that lead domino. And then the others fall
into place for a c court. This is a technique that I like
to call using an anchor finger. Instead of feeling like you have to
plot the whole chord shape down out of nowhere, use an anchor finger to get your bearings
on where the other fingers should go. Yes, it’ll feel slow at first, but
that’s okay. Remember, this is a journey. Eventually you’re gonna reach a point
to where you almost can plop an entire chord shape down out of seemingly
thin air. You’ll get there, but it doesn’t happen immediately. I want you to start with this anchor
finger idea and then slowly work up to placing two fingers down at the same
time and then ultimately all three. So that’s that g to c transition.
You strum your g cord, let it ring, lift off those fingers, drop that anchor
finger, make the c chord and strum it, and the same thing on your
way back to the g chord. Go ahead and lift up all
the, all those fingers. I like to use my pinky
finger as my anchor. So third fret of the high e
and then back to that g cord, which brings up a really
good point. You know, just because I am suggesting that you
use your ring finger as an anchor finger. When you go to the c chord, that doesn’t mean that’s the
end all be all anchor finger. Maybe you find it easier to anchor your
index finger first or your middle finger first. That’s fine. I just want you
to understand that concept of okay, if I let one finger lead the
way and become the anchor, I can build the chord shape around it
rather than again feeling like you have to plop the entire core
down immediately. Okay, so you have two types of core transitions, the one that keeps one finger
or a couple fingers in common, and the other one where you have to
employ the use of an anchor finger because your fingers completely
change orientation. You’re
going to encounter both, so it’s really good to practice
each type of transition. And speaking of practicing transitions, I’m going to lead you through an exercise
that has you transitioning from a g chord to a d cord, back to a g chord than to a c
chord and then back to a g chord. And then we’re going to go
full on round Robin. Okay, so you get a chance at every
permutation of g, C, and d. And here’s the cool thing, once
you nail these transitions, a whole world of songs is going to
open up to you. I’m not kidding you. You will literally be able to play
hundreds if not thousands of songs. If you refine your transitions
between g and C and D, because there are many, many, many
songs that include those courts. A Bob Marley’s three little birds,
Johnny caches, ring of fire, the Beatles, paperback writers, Sweet Home,
Alabama. I mean classic, classic songs. Use these three very, very chords and the transitions
you’re about to work on. So I want you to keep that in mind
because that’s the light at the end of the tunnel. Yes, transitions can be
difficult, but the more you work on them, the easier they get. The easier they get, the quicker you’ll be
able to play those songs. This is just one lesson in the series
where I’ll take you from zero to guitar player in 30 days by teaching you the
four super fund skills that’ll get you hooked on guitar. Before you get started, you’ll need to download the tabs course
guide and 30 day checklist to get yours. Just click on the link in the
description or visit 30 days to play.com.

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Comments

  1. Argh! I just found this series but I already started the 22 lesson beginner series. Should I switch to this one?

  2. I just play one finger bar chords, and move that one finger up, or down the fret board to where it needs to be, and if I want a G, I simply strum all 6 strings open. I keep my guitar tuned to Open G. It works great for me.

  3. I've always played the D chord with my pointer and middle finger reversed from how you play it (ie pointer on the e string and middle on the G). Is this difference in my technique gonna become a hindrance further down the line when chord shapes and transitions become more complex?

  4. I was taught to land the bass note finger first to give lil more time to make the chord shape … meaning you theoretically can start strum once the E string or A string is fretted … and you’d continue bass notes to higher end treble note fretting …. for most part the main difficult one is the G to C your showing , for me anyways … always has been and think always will he a clumsy feeling no matter how many thousands of times I practiced / practice it hehe

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