Does Fasted Exercise Actually Work? | The GTN Show Ep. 120

Does Fasted Exercise Actually Work? | The GTN Show Ep. 120


– Welcome back to the GTN Show, and you’ll be glad to see, I am at least, that it’s not just me
in the set this week. – Yeah, I’m very sorry to have
left you last week, Fraser, but you did a fantastic job on your own. If you do follow us on social media, you probably noticed
that Heather and myself were across in Lanzarote. We’ve got loads of great videos to come, going into Christmas and beyond. In particular, we got quite an exciting, rather cheeky cyclist-versus-runner race. – Yeah, Mark has been telling me a little bit about this, so I’m certainly looking forward to seeing that video coming out. On top of that, we will actually
be heading out of the set to discuss the concept of fasted training. – Mm, and we’ve also got some rather exciting
news about Roger Federer. Now, you may be wondering why on earth I’m chatting
about a tennis player, now. Well, all will be unveiled later. – Yeah, and we’re also
going to be discussing pro cyclists who go running, and who was the fastest, but not whether they were fasted or not. Although maybe they were. Anyway, we’re also going to be discussing lots of rather fast times
from the pro triathletes out there racing this weekend. (upbeat electronic music) Okay, now a subject that
we have been quizzed on time and time again, it’s fair to say, is the notion of fasted training. Now, in other words, when we go and train before we’ve fueled ourselves
up with carbohydrate, and the best example, I
guess, is in the mornings, training prior to having our breakfast. Now, traditional research would state that as endurance athletes in general, we really rely upon having carbohydrates to be able to train effectively, but there are a number of
newer studies out there now that are suggesting that
there is a lot to be said about this fasted type of training. – Yeah and, well, it’s
something we’ve used quite a bit in the past
in our own training, the idea being that, by
using this fasted training, we can improve our body’s ability to use fat as a fuel during exercise, and therefore saving that muscle glycogen for when the intensity really kicks on. So, it does mean that we need
to be able to tap into both, so it doesn’t mean just
purely doing fasted training. We need to have a mix in our training. So, what we tended to do in the past is actually using some
shorter, easier sessions like an easy run in the morning, and we’d do that fasted, but then also for those
bigger key sessions, we’d do that carbohydrate-fueled. – Yeah, and I guess this is something that we’ve both loosely used, or been advised upon,
certainly, over the years. But, it turns out there are a number of other further benefits, too. – Yeah, and now a study
actually, conveniently, just down the road, at
the University of Bath, conducted by Rob Edinburgh
and Javier Gonzalez has done just this, and they have shown that there’s some, well, really quite evident
health benefits to it, too. – Correct, so we’re lucky to have Javier right here with us in Bath to discuss the findings of
his most recent study with us. Thanks for coming along. – Thanks for the invite. – Not at all. – We’ve known for a number of years that the type of food we eat, the total amount, and the timing of that during a race can really influence
performance on that day. But what’s become increasingly
clear over the last few years is that by timing our food in and around our training sessions, we can also enhance some of
the adaptations to training that in the long term can also
influence our performance. And along those lines, we’ve been studying whether exercising before
or after breakfast, or in other words, in an
overnight fasted state, can help achieve greater
benefits from exercise. – So just some other
general health benefits as aside from just the
potential burning of extra fat? – Yeah, well, the thing
we’re interested in is, essentially, how the
muscle adapts to exercise. And the implications of that
have both performance effects, but also health effects. And that’s over and
above just fat-burning. So, yeah, we’ve known for a long time that if you exercise in
an overnight fasted state, or before breakfast, you’ll
burn quite a lot more fat than if you’d had a
high-carbohydrate breakfast before that exercise. But in addition to that fat-burning, it seems like we get a number
of other benefits as well, that may improve our performance, and may also improve our health. – And what would those health benefits… What would a quick summary of those be? – Yeah. In our latest study, we found that, even though these two groups of people did exactly the same amount of exercise, and the same intensity, by doing it before breakfast, not only did they burn more fat, but their muscle actually
produced more proteins involved in glucose transport. So, in other words, they’re better able to take sugar out of the
bloodstream and into muscle, and improved insulin-sensitivity. So, reduced risk of diabetes. – Well, that’s a really
hot topic at the moment, isn’t it? – Yeah, yeah. – Right then, I guess I’d better go and start doing some more
training before breakfast! (laughter) Right, now that has been fascinating to hear their opinions on this subject, and I guess we’d like
to know your opinion. Is this something, fasted training, that you have done? Simple “yes” or “no” to this week’s poll, and you can click on the clink somewhere up there above Mark’s head to let us know what you think. – Yeah, and also, do get involved in the comments section down below to let us know why you do it, if you do, what your experiences have been, how often you do it, and so on. But now, for last week’s poll, Fraser asked you whether
you think Alistair Brownlee will qualify for Tokyo 2020 Olympics. – Yeah, now I guess the answer… The results to this answer’s
been fairly clear-cut, and I’m not surprised, to be honest, because he has won two
Olympic gold medals already, so he knows what he’s doing. So, yeah, 78% of you said “Yes, “we think he is going to qualify,” and 22% of you say “No”. I will add that I do think that him managing to do this this time is going to be significantly
harder than in the previous. – Yeah, he’s definitely
got his work cut out. Well, the GB team alone is quite a tough field to battle against. – Yeah, I think it’s going to
be a fascinating few months to see what rolls out
towards the Olympics. (electronic riff) – Okay, at the beginning of this show, I alluded to the 20-time
Grand Slam tennis champion, Roger Federer, and some
link with triathlon. Now, I don’t, unfortunately, have any news of him entering into a triathlon, although that would be rather exciting. Maybe that is to come. – Lots of other good Swiss athletes doing well already in triathlon. – Yeah. But what I do have news of is that he has bought a rather large stake in the Swiss running manufacturer, On, who does have quite a good
presence within triathlon. – Now, he isn’t willing to disclose quite how much money he has
invested in the company, but we’ve got a quote here which we both found quite interesting, because Roger Federer said, “It’s a chunk of money big enough “that I had to think carefully about it,” Which would suggest that
he’s really going into this with some real interest, and wanting to make a real difference in this fairly new running brand. – Yeah, and whilst, I guess, he’s not going to have
some formal role at On, what the company have said, though, is that they are hoping to
release a shoe in the next year that Federer and On have worked on. Which, well, I don’t know, is it going to be a tennis shoe? Is it going to be a run shoe? – [Fraser] Who knows? – [Mark] Very exciting to see. – So now, we’re going to take things back to triathlon, we promise, but actually, it’s with
some disappointing news of one of the stars of
the ITU series this year. Non Stanford from the UK has unfortunately had
to undergo knee surgery, which is not ideal when you’re in the year before the Olympic games. She apparently was
suffering some knee pain towards the end of this season, had it looked at, had some rest, and then has just recently
had some cartilage removed from her knee
to hopefully fix that up going into the 2020 season. She expects to miss the
start of the WTS season, but certainly hopes to be
able to finish that through right through to the grand
final in Canada in August. – Yeah, we all hope she
makes a speedy recovery. Moving on now, now it’s a well known fact that pro cyclists need to and want to take some time off
the bike over the winter. I mean, they do spend
a heck of a long time in the saddle during the season. But it does appear that some of them quite like to keep the fitness going, so they use alternative methods, so some of them like to head– – Funny, that. – Yeah, some of them like to
head out for a run, instead. Now, we’ve been having a
bit of fun here at GTN, scrolling through some
of their Strava profiles, and we’ve come across
some of the pro peloton that like to run over the off-season. – There’s a few of them. – Yeah, so first up, we’ve
got Greg Van Avermaet, and he’s head out for
a nice little 10K run running at 6 minute 11 per kilometer. – [Fraser] It’s not bad at all. – [Mark] No, it’s all right,
pretty nice, steady running. And then, we’ve got Alexander Kristoff. He’s running 8K at 5:06 per kilometer. – [Fraser] Yeah, it’s trucking along. – [Mark] Yeah, these are
pretty powerful guys. But it gets more exciting. We’re ramping it up here. So we’ve got Owain Doull. He did a, well, just shy of
5K in 4:58 per kilometer. Now, we’re moving on to Thibaut Pinot, and he’s pushing on almost 12K, 4:29 per kilometer pace. Now, these guys are practically runners! – [Fraser] Yeah, I don’t think I want to go fro a run with him. – [Mark] Trumping it all, though, we’ve got Michael Valgren here, and he’s done a 10K
run, 4:21 per kilometer. Did it in 44 minutes. – [Fraser] Yeah, he’s a
silent, closet runner. – [Mark] Yeah. Maybe we’ll get him over
to triathlon soon, eh? (laughter) – Now, moving on from
last week’s discussion of feats of endurance, where I talked about a double Deca Ironman. Still trying to wrap my head
around that one, if I’m honest. Well, we’ve got another feat
of endurance for you this week, because there is a
Cape-to-Cape cycling record, which, I’ll be honest with you, I didn’t even know it existed, but it has just been broken. It is going from the very tip of Norway to the very southernmost point of Africa, and Jonas Deichmann from Germany has just shattered that record, taking it from 102 days down to 72. – Yeah, he set out on the 8th of September from North Cape in Norway, as Fraser said, and then, obviously,
starting off in the Arctic, moving down through Russia,
on some of the motorways, into the Middle East,
which you can imagine will be a bit of a logistical nightmare, and then about halfway
through, you enter into Africa. – Only halfway through! – I know, yeah. This is all unsupported, just to put this into some perspective. So, he’s got to carry
all this gear with him, and if you think you’re
starting off in the Arctic, in pretty cold weather gear, and then, you’re trying
to get off into Africa. The temperature’s going to be
racking up quite a lot there. So, yeah, trying to be
prepared for all of that is quite some feat, and yeah, as you say, he broke that record quite substantially. So chapeau, yeah, hats off to you. That’s really impressive. – [Fraser] Wonder how many punctures. – Well, now for our weekly
update from Heather, who is racking up and earning more and more drops on Zwift. She has been busy doing a
couple of workouts for us. She’s just done a run workout, but now, we’re going to catch up
with her doing a bike workout. – Okay, apologies, it’s not pretty. It was a rather sweaty workout, but as I mentioned, I got
my run down last night, and 12 hours later, got my
second bike workout done, so I’m now two and two into the academy. But, problem being, as the
boys have already mentioned, I am about to take a bit of a break, and I’m going away for two weeks. So, today’s session was
really good, actually. It’s been my favorite
Zwift session so far. It was the half distance workout, so working just below FTP for most of it. It was just an hour, I’m
still on the warm down, but I really enjoyed that, and I think it might be time to actually retest my FTP. So I’m on two, but that
felt quite comfortable, so I did actually up it for a little bit. So, yeah, feeling pretty
good after that one. Although, now, I’m going
on holiday for two weeks, and I’m going to be doing
some mountain biking. So it’ll be interesting to see if any fitness stays
with me when I get back, and I might actually be
hoping to lower my FTP, but fingers crossed. I will be back with a report in a couple of weeks’ time, so have fun on the show, guys. I’ll see you soon. Ciao! – Now, some of you might remember that a couple of weeks ago, I unboxed some very swish
new ASOS cycling clothes. Now, that was the brand new Equipe range that they have just put out on the market, and we have now got the names
of two very lucky winners who have got that complete
set of four items, one set for each of them. So, drum roll… (drumming) We have got Andrew Yee
Fung, and Eric Parker, so very well done to you. – Yeah, while we’re
talking about clothing, there is still time,
also, to take advantage of our Black Friday offer. Now, we’ve got 25% off our Pro Team and Pro Training gear that Heather, myself, Fraser, we all wear, as well as some of our
casuals and accessories. Now, it is all selling quite fast, so if you want some, go
over to our shop quickly. That offer’s going to be running
’til the 4th of December. Maybe even an opportunity to
start your Christmas shopping! (electronic riff) – Right, now moving on to race news, and luckily this week,
there are some races for us to talk about. And first up is Ironman Cozumel, which doubled as the Latin
American Championships, which meant that there was
a strong field in place. On the men’s side of things, there was some incredibly fast racing, with the top six men all dipping under the eight-hour barrier, largely due to the fact that there’s always a very fast current-assisted swim in Cozumel, and the fact that the bike
ride is completely flat. But nonetheless, there was also some extremely fast running times too, and none other than Tyler
Butterfield, who took the win, produced an incredible run time, starting some nine minutes down, but ending up taking the
lead by the 15-mile marker, and never looking back. He went on to run a 2:38 to take the win in 7 hours 44 minutes, which is incredibly fast. Second place to Michael
Weiss from Austria, and third, Mario de Elias from Argentina. – [Mark] Over on the women’s
side, it was Carrie Leicester that had a very convincing
wire-to-wire win. In fact, this is her third
Ironman win of the season, having won Ironman Nice, Mont-Tremblant, and even a top-10 finish, in fact it was eight
place at Kona this year. Well, she won this one in a time of 8 hours and 38 minutes. Second place went to Maja Stage Nielsen, and third place went to Michelle Vesterby. And then on to Ironman Arizona. Now, this was a women’s only pro race, having had Iron Man Florida
just a couple of weeks before, which a male pro only race. Now, this was an absolutely stacked field on the women’s side. We had Sarah Crowley taking the win. Second place went to Heather Jackson, and then third place to Meredith Kessler. – [Fraser] Yeah, now there
was also some 70.3 racing happening at the weekend, and Ironman 70.3 Western Australia was won by Max Neumann, second place went to Alexander Polizii, and third place to Levi Maxwell. – [Mark] Yeah, and on the women’s, it was Hannah Wells that took the win, Grace Thek that took second place, and Rebecca Clarke in third. – Now, moving over to Asia, we had one of the most longstanding triathlons on the circuit, and that was the Laguna Phuket Triathlon, which is a slightly odd distance, between an Olympic distance
and a half Ironman. 1.8K swim, 50K bike, and a 12K run. Always looks fantastic, the pictures that come out from this race. Wish I’d always managed to do that one. – Me too. – The women’s race was won by Switzerland Imogen Simmonds, second place went to Emma
Pallant from Great Britain, and third was Australia’s Dimity Lee Duke. – [Mark] Yeah, and on the women’s side, it was Reudi Wild that took the win, Michael Raelert in second, then Krzystof Hadas in third. And we also had OTILLO Malta this weekend, swimrun race. This was just under 40
kilometers in total, 31 kilometers of which was running, 8.7 ish kilometers of it was swimming. – [Fraser] That’s a lot
of swimming, isn’t it? – Yeah. So, that was broken up
over 13 different swims. Now, the men’s win went to
Team Head Gravelines Tri. Women’s meant to Team ARK Swimrun, and then the mixed win went to Team Envol. (electronic riff) Well, now for us to take a look through all your photos that
you’ve been sending in to us. We’ve got a pain cave to kick off. This one’s sent in from Callum
from Camberley in Surrey, and his rather nice log cabin. – [Fraser] I was, admittedly, thinking I was opening up a picture
from somewhere in the Alps, or Scandinavia, maybe, but no no no, here in the UK. – Yeah, I was hoping we’d see some skis hanging up, maybe some lederhosen,
maybe a bar or something. He said he’s got a Cervelo S3, a Trek Emonda SL 6, and as
you can see in the picture, they’ve got their Giant on
the turbo trainer there. – [Fraser] Also, yeah, got foam rollers in the corner, got some weights, dumbbells, loads of medals up on the
wall, a very nice towel. I wasn’t sure initially what that was, whether it was a funny
sort of poster material, but actually, it’s a
towel, I’m fairly certain. – But also, they said once
they finish their workout, they can walk out and
jump into their hot tub! – I told you, Scandinavia! – Really cool. And moving on, Robert sent in his from… Well, he hasn’t given a
location, other than “Home”. So, he said, “Following the recent show “where UK pain caves
were requested for show, “I submitted my garage setup.” And very nice one, too. – [Fraser] I like this as well, yeah. There’s a lot going on in that garage. Lots of storage, lots of bikes up there, we’ve got the washing
machine in the corner… – [Mark] Well, that’s efficient, very good time use. You finish your session,
take your clothes off, chuck ’em straight in the washing machine. – [Fraser] Well, I can
see the Fairy Liquid up in the top corner, which for us here in the UK,
that’s the washing powder. – Also, another person, so they’ve got a sauna in their garden. – These lucky people, my word! – We need to sort one out. – If you’re not getting hot enough during your turbo training sessions… – Oh, he does say later on, “I live in Whitstable in Kent, “so the sea is also about 200
meters from the front door.” This sounds like the
ideal training location. – Can we come and do training? – Yeah, maybe we need to! The next one, this is a
great photo sent in by Chris, and this is actually from Richmond Park. This is another UK-based one. So this is is his Ribble Ultra Tri bike, similar to that of Adam Bowden that we featured earlier this year. A really nice bike, actually. – [Fraser] I mean, I haven’t
seen it up close and personal, but would be intrigued to do so. I mean, there’s a lot of fast
riders on the Ribble bikes on the track scene as well. – [Mark] Yeah, no, absolutely lovely bike. – I will say, I actually said to Mark, I have run in Richmond Park, not too many times, to be fair, but I was blown away that this is a park with all the deer grazing
in the background, need us not forget, and it’s bang smack in
the middle of London! You can see a little herd of
deer here behind the bike, which I guess is why he’s
stopped to take the picture. So, thank you Chris. – [Mark] Yeah, brilliant. So next one, not from the UK this time. This has come from Hong Kong, this is actually on Victoria Peak. This is sent in by Rob,
with his Scott Plasma, and this is fully tricked out. – [Fraser] Yeah, I mean
both look incredible, the bike and the view, let us not forget. I mean, I thought the
one from Richmond Park was my winner, but actually, I’m torn. This looks incredible! – Yeah, it does. So, he’s got the fairly
new Drag2Zero bars on there we’ve seen the likes of Joe Skipper using, which almost look like
you’re in the cockpit of an airplane, or something. Really cool. The 3D-printed… I think it is a storage box,
it goes behind the bottle. But the main reason actually is to basically improve the
airflow from the bottle area. – [Fraser] An incredible
set of wheels on there, some Zipp 808s. So, that is a very fast bit of kit. – Yeah. Please do keep sending in all your photos. You can use the photo uploader, link on-screen right now, but you can also find that in
the description just below. (electronic riff) – Right now, it’s time of the show for our caption competition, and as ever, you guys have outdone us with some pretty witty snippets to go with our picture, which was, last week, I grabbed one from Muncie 70.3, which was last summer, or this summer, should I say, and I just thought that the
dinosaur looked quite good. I mean, who sees a dinosaur
when they’re running along in the middle of a 70.3? So, NCB was first on the mark with, “Human spotted during
this year’s Triassic Triathlon.” – [Mark] Very good. Len Wittrock said, “I
don’t know about you, “but I’m feeling Dino-sore. “is the finish close?” – [Fraser] Yeah that’s clever, I like what you’ve done there. Savage Poet came back with, “T-Rex at T2: Where are you? “I’ve been waiting for ages!” – But the winner is Kevin McLendon, said, “My coach may be an old dinosaur, “but he knows what it takes to survive.” Very good, you are the
caption comp winner. Get in touch, we’ll ping
out a cap to you ASAP, but for this week’s caption comp photo, this one actually comes from Malta from the OTILLO race out there. Now, just to give you a bit of an idea as to what this photo’s all about, the Popeye show, that many
of you have hopefully seen, used to be filmed out in Malta, and they still have that village there. So this race actually comes down the cliffs into this village, and here is Popeye himself! (laughs) – Is that really what Popeye did? – I think so. – I just thought he just
got really big muscles. – So anyway, the guys are high-fiving him as they go through, so drop your captions in
the comments section below! – Well, that takes us to the
end of yet another GTN show, so hopefully you’ve enjoyed it, but we’ve got some more really good videos coming up this week for
you to look forward to. Roadside mechanicals, if that’s something
you have an issue with, we’ve got a swim tips video with David McNamee from Ironman Hawaii, and we have got run tips for beginners. – Yeah, and don’t forget about
our offers that are running, like the GTN shop for Black Friday. Get on over there fast
before they run out. 25% off a lot of our cycling kit, which is really good stuff. If you have enjoyed today’s video, hit that thumbs-up button. If you’d like to see more from GTN, you can click on the globe
and subscribe to the channel. We’ve actually just recently
had video coming out about the benefits of off-road running, and why you should maybe include
it into your own training, so you can see that by
clicking just down here. – Yeah, and if you want to
see our video in the pool that’s all about drills for improving your
freestyle swimming kick, you can find that here.

About the author

Comments

  1. You burn more fat during, but no difference in the amount of fat burnt during the day. Prefer not to hit the wall that early

  2. Fasted trainer here – but mainly for my longer easier sessions. Reason – mainly, because I wake up at 3 to be out by 3.30-4 so there isn't a lot of time for breakfast plus it wouldn't settle well in my stomach. The increased fat utilisation and adaptation to using fat as fuel are nice bonuses.

  3. I have been doing Early Morning Fasted training for a long time and I believe it has significant benefits, however it's tough to do high intensity training in a fasted state. So EMF should be done at zone 2 in order to avoid some negative impacts such as the use of protein for energy (and maybe breaking down muscle mass). So best is to mix and match, but certainly add one of two EMF's in your week.

  4. Sometimes I start training fasted with 0 energy, after running 30 40 minutes I suddenly have a energy surge. That I think is my body switching over 100% to fat. Love it. Can easily run 21k around 2 hours this way, on my Sunday run.

  5. In all my many years of training and racing Ive never trained after eating. I rarely eat much before a short race either, maybe just a clifbar if I feel exceptionally hungry.

  6. Hello,
    My name is Kilian and I am a 16-year-old sophomore attending Templeton High School. Running has always been my passion, but I have taken my training very seriously for only the past few months. However, I have already taken part in two races, both 5 kilometer (3.1 mile).  In the first one at Hearst Ranch Winery, I placed 3rd out of about 300 runners. During my second race at Cali Paso Winery I achieved 2nd place, with a time of 17:48, also from about 300 runners. My goal is to race half marathons in the upcoming year, I will be participating in one in February 2020. Currently, I am in my second training block for the 13.1 mile distance on road, I would also like to complete a trail half marathon. For this goal however, I would need money for new running shoes for trails (and roads) racing and training, clothing for all seasons of the year, and gear that would allow me to train in the best way possible. Ex. Running jackets for the winter, compression clothing for recovery days, sunglasses, socks, shorts, pants, nutrition, etc. I am planning to shift my running up to an even higher and more consistent level in 2020, therefore I need to buy on gear now; I also need some better, warmer clothing for the cold winter months. Companies that want to donate or sponsor me, will be represented on the back of my running shirt when I race, also I will mention them whenever I will be interviewed. Just contact me at [email protected] for further information.

    Thank you for all your support that will allow me to continue my journey with running throughout high school and hopefully college and on!!!

    Here is a spreadsheet  of the costs  with most of the things I will need.

    My GoFundMe can be found at: https://www.gofundme.com/f/kilian039s-running-training-and-racing

    My running profile at Nike Run Club is K P, description: CALIFORNIA, you can friend me so that you can see my monthly progress.  I rarely use Strava, but you can find me here at Kilian Pankowski.

  7. I've tried training while fasting, be careful you can burn yourself out if you get it wrong and it takes weeks or months to recover. A one day fast is ok, but I tried a 3 day fast once and it destroyed me.

  8. Popeye loves spinach, spinach is known to contain a lot of iron. So basically what i would say to popeye is: "Youuu are an IRONMAAN!"

  9. If you cannot help me personally, the next best thing to do is sharing this post with your other friends and family that could help;)

  10. Last year I had a hand injury that required emergency surgery. I was out of training for 2 months and had gained 20lbs. I felt horrible. Once recovered I heard about fasted training and gave it a try. The goal each day was 16hrs (so I fasted breakfast). I would train at the end of my fast during my lunch break (30min) and then grab food on the go to refuel on my way back to work. In 1-2 months I had lost all 20lbs and gained a significant amount of muscle. I ended the season with a PR at our local triathlon in South Lake Tahoe, Ca (winning 1st place overall). Fasted training works!

  11. #Caption: Bluto tricks Popeye to enter a triathlon, just to be alone with Olive. Popeye crosses the finish line in super record time . . . and Bluto gets a BlackEye!

  12. Have never fasted but I'm curious. I'm up at 3:30am and eat a banana and toast, with water and a small black coffee, whilst completing 45 mins of press-ups prior to leaving for the gym. I then train for 2.5 hours (mixture of rowing/crossfit/weights/running/body pump. My issue with fasting is that of energy, I'd be curious to understand how I'd maintain the very high intensity of multiple classes and daily muscle/cardio punishment without food prior to training. During training I consume an 'inter' BCAA to ensure I maintain performance and take in the optimum nutrients/muscle builders/recovery minerals. Within 30mins of finishing I have a big bowl of oats with sultanas and protein bulk. I'm 47 and have been on the treadmill for close to 30 years. The (almost) lifelong experiment continues! Looking forward to watching Ali live at Ironman Busselton.

  13. I train fasted 'cos most sessions I do can be done fasted (including high intensity but not too much volume sessions). Partly because I don't like to rush eating, partly because I can, partly because I don't want to feel my gut while training, partly because of the fitness benefits, partly because of the health benefits.

  14. First workout of the day is always fasted, not because I like it, but because I have to. Always worried not eating was hurting so happy to see there’s hope

  15. I run commute and typically do it before breakfast. In fact most of the time I just wait until lunch or close to before eating. I've no idea if it brings benefits (typically it's a aerobic type of jog, ~30 minutes). I just feel good. I started doing that mostly because I'm not all that hungry when I wake up and prefer to not run on a full stomach.

  16. You should check out Dr Stacy Sims in regards to fasted training for females! Definitely not recommended for the women out there.

  17. Look at the elevation profiles of the pro cyclists, some are running on the flat and some have quite hilly sessions. Not a very scientific comparison.

  18. Can you explain why when fasting i still can run about 15km easy but when playing in playground with my son i feel so so so tired

  19. Can you explain why when fasting i still can run about 15km easy but when playing in playground with my son i feel so so so tired

  20. I follow a high carb low fat diet but have always done majority of my Monday to Friday morning workouts fasted…except key power/speed sessions that go over an hour

  21. Caption comp:

    "I'm Popeye the swimrun man"

    "I'm Popeye the swimrun fan"

    "I'm strong to the finish"

    "Cause I eats me spinach"

    "I'm Popeye the swimrun man"

  22. Ahhh 😍 featured!!!

    Caption: “With all his spinach, Pop-Eye is sure to be an Ironman, but what about his girlfriend, Otillo Oyl?”

  23. How often should you do fasted sessions to get the benefit? I do one fasted bike session Z2 c. 75mins each week – is this enough to be worthwhile?

  24. Caption: All together now…. "we're strong to the finish cos' we're all full of spinach on Popeye's Maltese Ironman…. toot toot!" Uck, uck, uck, uck, uck.

  25. Hmmm….delving a little deeper into the evidence, there’s little to show that performance benefits. Small-sample sizes, short-duration studies that are insufficient to make any conclusive training/performance inferences. I’ll stick to breakfast.

  26. Yes fasted state works. This is NOT new info, as for sure 45 years ago, it was being taught in University. Still good to find out about newer studies. 🙂

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