Four Directions of Wellness – Baby-Friendly Hospital

Four Directions of Wellness – Baby-Friendly Hospital


♪ Yá’át’ééh and welcome to Four
Directions of Wellness.
I’m Roberta Diswood. (introducing clans) In 2014, Northern Navajo
Medical Center became a
Baby-Friendly Hospital. Today, we will learn what
that means and how it
benefits moms and families. We have two guests. Antoinette
Kleiner is a Lactation
Consultant at Northern Navajo
Medical Center. And Angelina Smith is a
Lactation Consultant with
Public Health Nursing. Thank you, ladies, for being
here. Antoinette go ahead and
introduce yourself. Hello, thanks for having us.
My name’s Antoinette Kleiner. I am a nurse for 20 years and
a mother and a grandmother, and I’ve been here for 16 years,
most recently as the lactation
consultant for Shiprock
Service Unit. In my culture, which is Guam,
the Chamorro people also
identify ourselves by clan. And so my mother’s clan is
called Dicta, which is known
for their strength and their
warrior characteristics. And then my father’s clan is
called Done’, which is our word
for hot pepper. Well, thank you, Antoinette,
for being here. Angie, if you want to introduce
yourself? I’m Angelina Smith and I work
for under Public Health Nursing. I’ve been a nurse for 33 years. And my clan is Tl’ógí, and
‘Áshiihí is my father’s side. And I’ve been working as a
lactation consultant going on
18 years. Well, I want to thank you guys
both for being here. Why is it important for a
hospital to be recognized
as a baby-friendly hospital? Baby-friendly is a really
prestigious designation. It’s an accreditation that shows
people that our hospital has
really worked hard to create the safest start
for all babies. So we really work to provide
the gold standard of
breastfeeding support and care
here at our hospital. And are there a certain steps
or anything to obtain this
title? Yes, it’s a pretty rigorous
designation. it’s one that only about 1 in 4
hospitals in our country today
actually hold. When we started the program
back in 2014, only 1 out of 9
babies were actually born in a
baby-friendly hospital. You really need to go through
and evaluate your program and create processes and
practices that help families
really get off to the healthiest
start. So we go through lots and lots
of policy development and
training for our staff as well as our families.
We work hard on prenatal
education. And then supporting them
through their delivery with
hands-on support. Things like experiencing skin-to-skin in a
brand new way from
past generations. Keeping moms and babies
together 24/7, so that they can
learn to trust and bond with
each other. And providing them lots and lots
of resources and available
assistance along the way. So we work hard throughout
the hospital to provide a
continuity of care that’s
unmatched really from prenatal through delivery
postpartum and back out
into the community. And I find that thats really
been our strength for
maintaining this designation. And how does being baby-
friendly benefit… You talked a little bit about
it, but how does it benefit
the mom and the child? Oh there’s so many things
that it helps. From a mother and grandmother
standpoint, it really for me
the biggest thing is connecting
them back to their families. And I find that, you know, what
I’ve learned from the elders
here, is that when we have that
disconnect – when we
experience that disconnect – during what we call the formula
generation, the formula era, we really lost a lot of bonding
and connection with
our children. So as a grandmother for me,
that’s the most important thing. It helps their health.
It helps the mother’s health. It keeps everybody, you know,
more strong and ready to
help us make a better future
for all of us. And there’s just so many things
from cancer to diabetes to
asthma and allergies that it helps our children
avoid if we breastfeed them
for the first six months of
life. And not only that, because
since our community is
focussing more on preventing
obesity and diabetes, and that’s one way, making the
best choice for your baby, and it’s mother feeding their
own child. It’s a big
prevention. It’s a good start. So do you guys offer any sort
of class or anything that
really goes into what to do? Yes, we start prenatally, and
truly a lot of the work is done
in every point of contact here
in our hospital. So wherever a mother is
receiving her care, whether
she is here in the hospital at
our women’s health clinic or she’s receiving care through
our group prenatal programs or in our family medicine
clinic or even out at our
satellite and field clinics, families are receiving education
at that prenatal visit. So we start there.
We reinforce that with
childbirth tours. We have consults that
happen for high risk
patients if they have a need to start seeing Angie or I
prior to their delivery. We start working then. And then Angie gets, you know,
referrals, and I’ll let you
talk about that. So we make sure we meet that
need wherever it is. As a public health nurse and
plus all the other nurses that –
there’s about 12 of us I think,
we’re all trained. And I take care of all the
advance care and breastfeeding, like engorgement or any other
complication. So if you have a mother that
delivers outside our facility
and comes back, I’m the one that gets that
referral or Antoinette and I
consult, and we help that mother in the
home. So all our public health nurses
do the same thing. But if they need more special
needs, then they come to me
for that referral. And our providers in the
hospital know the same
thing, too. That’s really good to hear. So what happens when a mom goes
home with her baby especially
from a baby-friendly hospital? What happens from a baby-
friendly hospital that stands
out from hospitals that are not
baby-friendly, is that community effort. So all of the families who
deliver here, get access to a
public health nurse referral that is very important and
often times vital to being able
to see them. We also have a wide variety of
community resources all across
the area and even nationally that they’re able to access. And our pediatricians regularly
schedule the baby for a follow-
up visit within about 48 hours
of going home, so that we have a chance again
to make sure that feeding is
going well, that the baby is
doing well, that the mommy feels like she’s
doing very well with her
breastfeeding techniques. So once we get the referral as
public health nurses, what I do
with mine is I go and continue
that same standard of care in the home, making sure that
they stay put, which is
rooming in. They stay in the house so they
get to know their baby, okay? And help them in a home
environment how to help that
mom to get comfortable with her own environment
so she’ll do better of providing
breastfeeding to her baby. And I know when mom goes
home, you know, always the
biggest thing people are trying
to think about is work. And how do you guys help to
address that? We spend a lot of time and
effort which is wonderful, because from our colleagues
in other locations we have
found that they don’t provide the
service we do. We actually help moms navigate
requesting an electric breast
pump for return to work and to have that paid for by
her insurance company. Many times that work load
is actually put on the patient. Here’s a prescription from your
doctor, and you have to go and
figure out what to do with it. We don’t do that here. We actually provide that
service for our families. We’ve got some co-workers up
in the pediatric clinic who
also help us facilitate that, so that we can
help moms start off with a good
quality, insurance paid,
electric breast pump. And teach her how to use that
and prepare for going back
to work, so she can continue
breastfeeding her baby. And furthermore with what
we do in the home, if I have a mother who has
a concern and her employer
probably doesn’t know much
about the laws, So we have a nice brochure that
we can give her. Or even give
her contact numbers. Or even go there myself to the
employer and talk to them about
what kind of set-up they can… how to handle that working
mom to continue pumping
or even nursing her baby. And what final advice would you
give expecting mothers who are,
you know, planning to have children?
What do you guys… Well I always feel like
knowledge is power. But power is limited if there’s
a lot of barriers around a mom. So I really want moms and dads
and families to talk about it
together. Often times, families grew up
breastfeeding, but it wasn’t
necessarily something that
was discussed. So talking to the family,
making sure everybody
understands that mom’s
intention is to breastfeed, and what she may need from
them to help stay strong with
that, because even though it’s
natural, it’s not always easy. And when you have your family
wisdom around to provide support
for you, it makes it a little
bit easier. How about you, Angie? I think we like to…
I think what I really like for
the community since working in Shiprock for
such a long time, I use to see mothers nursing
back in the 60s and the 70s. And I would like to have that
community, that norm, that
mothers choose to breastfeed
their babies. And I don’t think we ever had
that many illnesses when the
mothers all breastfed their
babies. And it’s that big prevention
once again to prevent
diabetes and obesity and other
illnesses. I want to thank you guys
both for being here. This has been Four Directions
of Wellness.
Hágoónee’. ♪

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