Recumbent Bike vs. Upright for Knee Pain | Knee Exercises

Recumbent Bike vs. Upright for Knee Pain | Knee Exercises


I get asked a lot from patients whether or
not they should be using the bike at the gym, and specifically, whether they should use
the recumbent bike, which is the bike that has the back rest and you’re kind of in a
long sitting position versus the upright bike. The more stationary bikes you see in the gym
where you’re more upright, no back support. Things that almost mimic the outside. And it’s a real simple answer, the upright
bike is better. The recumbent bike is often recommended, really
just for your older population or your patients who might have a balance disorder, so they’re
worried about falling off the bike. They’re worried about being so high up that
they get a little scared and they need that back support, maybe and the hand support to
stay on and not be too concerned. The upright bike on the other hand, really
for a number of reasons is the way to go. In the presence of knee pain, it’s going to
allow the knee to bend and extend more consistently at a better angle, which is great for nourishment
for the knee. And it’s also going to allow the quads to
work more optimally, as well as the hamstrings. And lastly, you’re also going to be using
your core, so as you’re doing your rehab at the gym or rehab in a physical therapy clinic,
just strengthening your core as a secondary assignment is great for later on, when you’re
doing functional activities like squats and lunges. The key thing with the upright bike though,
is the setup. Too many people are setting up the bike where
it’s setup a little too low. It’s not allowing the knee to bend enough
and extend enough. Plus, they’re not getting the proper nourishment
inside the knee or the proper workout for your quad and hamstrings. The general rule is you want to have your
knee in a down position or when your foot’s in a down position to be at about 25 degrees
of flexion, which is not a lot. It’s almost full extension. Every repetition they’re getting to that spot. It’s much better for the knee, so in general
it’s the upright exercise bike, way before the recumbent.

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Comments

  1. This account of recumbent vs upright is so preposterous that it's really potentially harmful. Virtually every point is either wrong or misrepresented. Balance — 'bents actually demand more of the rider for balance. Knee extension is the same on both types. Not involving upper body so much can be a plus; support of the back, not calling for hyperextension of the neck can make the recumbent the choice in many cases. I won't go on. He may know knees but this guy knows nothing about bikes. IMHO.

  2. Functions great – is a great exercise bike, without the front handle bar i can watch TV, play a game, or use a tray table to use a laptop.
    Quiet – i can use this right next to the wife while watching TV, its practically silent.
    here is the link to it in case anyone is interested:amzn.to18pR1hP

  3. Thank you for your reply. We are talking generals here sir, not specific cases where a patient should be avoiding Neck hyperextension for example. And the Hip angle is terribly different on the 'bent compared to upright, which changes the forces on the Knee dramatically. Thanks for helping out though, just careful with the criticism please. Potentially harmful? Preposterous?

  4. Been riding for over 35 years, including 100k. With the venous return not having to work against gravity,my knees feel better after a recumbent ride,not to mention the comfy seated position,i'd say.

  5. Replaced my upright with a recumbent. Best thing I ever did, terrific results and much more enjoyable to ride, which prodouces longer rides, using it more frequently and actually looking forward to using it.

  6. This video is quite helpful. However, I want to let people know that there's an economical solution now for increasing strength, mobility and balance when recovering from an injured knee joint. The best exercise device for knee, calve, quadriceps or hamstring strenghening is hands down:  https://www.amazon.com/smithshaper. This SmithShaper Ab & Squat Roller Multi-Purpose Exerciser is compact, portable and even wearable for perfect posture rolling wall squats. It's used indoors or outdoors for performing twenty-five different fully-body exercises. This includes three squat alternatives as an alternative for what's discussed in this video. That is the strengthening of the critical leg muscles and tendons required for knee stability and improved range of motion for those with so called "bad knees."  I had an ACL surgery thirty years ago and back then, you were in a full  leg cast for 6 months.  This caused arthritis to start in my twenties.  I'm now 58 years old but thanks to the amazon SmithShaper my legs are strong. I play competitive beach volleyball three times per week for three hours each outing and my "bad knee" is holding up quite well..

  7. As if a recumbent bike is only for geriatric populations. Unfortunately this person (video) has very limited exposure to cycling. Both upright and recumbent bikes are excellent devices for moving and exercising the knees. His bias (geriatrics, people with balance disorders, etc) exposes his unfamiliarity with what he is addressing. I do worry that his `I know it all' attitude will be persuasive with people who need help. Why do I know this? I have no physical disabilities or limitations and am a world class recumbent cyclist. I prefer the recumbent bike because: no saddle sore, no numb wrists, no neck or shoulder pain, no pounding of my vertebral column … and, if I have and accident I don't risk breaking my neck.

  8. Loving my bike>>>ur2.pl/1144. It was quite easy to assemble, no issues at all. I followed a YouTube video about assembling it and that helped a lot. Only small issue is that moving it around is a bit of a drag because you can only bend the bike to a certain angle to be able to move the bike around, which to me isn't the best angle since i have to be constantly moving it. Wish the wheel was a bit larger or situated further back so one could bend it further out and make it easier to move around. Other than that, i have no issues.

  9. Very good video! Not 100% sure but appears some of my recent knee pain is related to recumbent bike, like implied in this video. Back to walking and less knee pain. I would say do what works best for you!

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